5 New Market Opportunity Trends – Thompson Reuters Foundation News

… Tech has done little to make the world a more equal place. Now Blockchain is promising to change this, by allowing value to be transferred without an intermediary such as a bank, and by granting people control over their own digital identity.    Simply put, blockchain is an open source digital ledger that acts like an accounting book and tracks all transactions. Everyone owns it but no one individual can make changes, which makes it almost completely tamper-proof. Blockchain allows people to prove their identity, enabling them to record transactions, and therefore enter the global economy.Relatively new to the world, blockchain is an immature opportunity space, with means that there are many competing versions of a blockchain future. While it is no longer just a theory, it is still a long way from being adopted across the board. Predictions point to mainstream uptake in 2025, but the way things are going, it may arrive much faster.

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Deloitte is Officially Launching Blockchain Lab in Dublin – CoinSpeaker

The new laboratory is staffed with 25 blockchain developers and designers working to transform the way digital services are provided.

Source: Deloitte is Officially Launching Blockchain Lab in Dublin – CoinSpeaker

Centrelink’s data matching problems could be solved with blockchain – finder.com.au

Governments across the globe are experimenting with the blockchain, the technology behind Bitcoin, as a way to reduce costs and provide more accountability to the public. In Europe alone, the United Kingdom, Ukraine and Estonia are experimenting with blockchains to fight corruption and deliver public services.Australia, too, is looking at what a blockchain might achieve. The recent problems with Centrelink’s automated data-matching system show precisely where a government blockchain would fit in.Rather than siloing our data in government agencies, we could create a single source of information. This would speed up our interactions with government, while reducing errors and fraud.

More at: Centrelink’s data matching problems could be solved with blockchain | finder.com.au

Blockchain To Run Welfare Show, Finland May Set Example – THE COINTELEGRAPH

Finland has recently started an unprecedented social experiment that will be watched around the world amid gathering interest in the idea of a universal basic income.It has become the first country in Europe to start paying an unconditional monthly sum to its unemployed citizens. During the next two years, 2,000 unemployed Finns, aged 25 to 58, will receive a guaranteed sum of 560 euros. The money will replace the social benefits they have been receiving so far and will be paid even if they find work.Kela, Finland’s social security authority, says that the project is aimed at reducing poverty and unemployment. At the same time, it is a perfect opportunity to explore ways to reduce bureaucracy and streamline the complicated social security systems and processes.Technology is significant in Finland. There are numerous examples where the country stayed ahead of the game and wowed the global community with innovative solutions. Perhaps we will see Finland become a pioneer in the application of Blockchain to deal with state bureaucracy.

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Bringing Moore’s Law to US healthcare – huge IT opportunities – diginomica/government

US healthcare processes and healthcare IT is in the technology dark ages. Unremitting complexity, sometimes lethal processes and gross inefficiency are areas where IT can provide cures. Here’s one set of scenarios that illustrate the point.

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Skills gap could hold back blockchain, AI, IoT advancements in 2017 | InfoWorld

Blockchains, AI, internet of things (IoT), and other emergent technologies are all going to be major forces in the coming year, notes IT industry analyst firm CompTIA in its IT Industry Outlook 2017 report.But these new-school technologies are hemmed in by some of the industry’s oldest and most pervasive problems: Lack of qualified people to make the most of them, laggardly approaches to security, and whether or not they represent solutions still looking for a good problem.

More at: Skills gap could hold back blockchain, AI, IoT advancements in 2017 | InfoWorld